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MOOCs Galore

Everywhere we look there seems to be another announcement for a cool MOOC course. Here is a selection of a few that we would love to take…

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E-learning and Digital Cultures from the University of Edinburgh, via Coursera:

This course will explore how digital cultures and learning cultures connect, and what this means for the ways in which we conduct education online. The course is not about how to ‘do’ e-learning; rather, it is an invitation to view online educational practices through a particular lens – that of popular and digital culture.

E-learning and Digital Cultures is aimed at teachers, learning technologists, and people with a general interest in education who want to deepen their understanding of what it means to teach and learn in the digital age. The course is about how digital cultures intersect with learning cultures online, and how our ideas about online education are shaped through “narratives”, or big stories, about the relationship between people and technology.

Video Games and Learning from the University of Wisconsin, via Coursera

Video games are one of the fastest trending topics in media, education, and technology. Research across fields as disparate as science, literacy, history, visual processing, curriculum, and computer science suggests that video games aren’t just fun – they can actually be good for your mind as well. This course will discuss current research on the kinds of thinking and learning that go into video games and gaming culture, benefits and drawbacks of digital gameplay, tensions between youth culture and traditional education, and new developments intended to bridge that growing divide.

Internet History, Technology, and Security from the University of Michigan, via Coursera

The impact of technology and networks on our lives, culture, and society continues to increase. The very fact that you can take this course from anywhere in the world requires a technological infrastructure that was designed, engineered, and built over the past sixty years. To function in an information-centric world, we need to understand the workings of network technology. This course will open up the Internet and show you how it was created, who created it and how it works. Along the way we will meet many of the innovators who developed the Internet and Web technologies that we use today

Introduction to Infographics and Data Visualization from the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas

This highly acclaimed course is running again, focusing on how to work with graphics to communicate and analyze data. With the readings, video lectures and tutorials available, participants will acquire enough skills to start producing compelling, simple infographics almost immediately.

The Future Of Storytelling from iversity.org

Are you interested in the mechanics of current fiction formats? Do you want to know how stories are told? Do you want to analyze, understand, contextualize and create stories and narratives?  Students will learn storytelling basics such as antagonist/protagonist relationships, narrative/narrated time (etc), have a look at exciting current media projects, analyze how they are designed and executed based on aforementioned basics, and discuss how (and if) new online tools and formats change the way stories are told and perceived.

Public Privacy: Cyber Security and Human Rights from iversity.org

Wild, wild web: Is the Internet a lawless no man’s land?  This course will examine the compliance between international human rights norms, standards and mechanism within legal and political frameworks and the growing cyber security regime. Debates about the loss of state sovereignty over cyber security, paired with the idea of internet freedom and users’ and citizens’ responsibility lead to the question, whether individual and state responsibility based on reciprocity and human rights compliance are reconcilable.

The DO School Start-Up Lab from iversity.org

Taking your great ideas and making them a reality is never easy. The Start-Up Lab helps you stop dreaming and start DOing, introducing you to the crucial steps necessary to get moving. This course is designed for people who have a concrete start-up idea as the course supports the actual implementation of relevant first steps. They will help you focus your idea to have broader social relevance. The course provides resources and knowledge from inspiring leaders in the start-up community and offers insight into the learning experiences of other emerging social entrepreneurs.

 

Enjoy!

 

MOOC Logo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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